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ames was written a book with steve forbes, "how capitalism will save us: why free people and free markets are the best answer in today's economy." elizabeth ames, first of all, tell us about yourself and your personal expense, particularly when it comes to economics. >> okay. well, i've been a financial journalist, but i've also been on both sides of the press release. so i started as a journalist and had in my own pr business, and i have also done projects, other communication projects with clients, among them riding, co-authoring books. and basically i have worked with steve forbes on a flat tax book and conversations led to the idea for this book. >> how did you meet steve forbes? >> i met him many years ago at an event that i did when i was at the university of southern california. and one thing led to another. i moved to new york, back to new york. i should i'm from new york and started working of course. so elizabeth ames, your practical express prior to working at forbes, how do you inject that into a capitalism will say the? >> basically i've learned a lot since forbes. wh
at the top, the steve jobs model or the great industrialists. what i mean is that companies that do well in the manufacturing space listen to the ideas of their employees, and are encouraging employees to come up with efficiencies this production to figure out how to assemble things more efficiently or how to make products that are more innovative, and they are soliciting those ideas. here is where i think a lot of the traditional critique on manufacturing misses the mark. robert rice, who makes the argument that there's knowledge worth -- people like lawyers, my profession, doctors, bankers, who are knowledge workers, and then there's manufacturers, and they completely miss the idea of modern manufacturing. modern manufacturing requires a lot of knowledge. these are people who are thinkers, who are innovating, and lawyers, i tell you, require a lot of repetitive work. people who say lawyers, you know, we draft documents, templates, and it's repettive. distinction is artificial, and the best manufacturers that i met were really listening to the ideas. let me give you two concrete example
you're hearing sounds familiar, that's because it's steve inskeep, who is co-host of morning edition, and author of the book "instant estimate. life and death in karachi." if you would like to hear mr. inskeep in a longer format, we will be webcasting his event from one of the tents here later this afternoon. you can watch that at booktv.org. our full schedule of live coverage on our webcast and from -- on c-span2 is available at booktv.org. >> now from 2012 mike book fair, book tv sat down to discuss the book "heroes for my daughter." >> host: now joining us on our book tv set in miami is a affirm -- familiar face. brad melt sir. it's not often we talk about lisa simpson and dollie parton and the three stooges. >> i bring only the highest of high brow wherever i go. you're talking to me because of my love for my daughters, and seven years ago, on the night my daughter was born, i did a trick i did for my son. i rote "heroes for my daughter." and when it started writing the book -- on the night i was born, my father bought a bottle of sham page, and he said he would hope it when his
and lori, steve and sharon in the library. it is a great team working here. i am very grateful to all of them. getting back to the system, caroline mentioned playing in the desk. it was exactly in the space underneath the desk, the and the whole system was in there next to the knee hole. decades later, it was described where the microphones were. >> if i could interrupt, the agent had bestial service in the secret service. it made this assignment interesting. >> his job was to protect president kennedy from electronic surveillance. [laughter] so he was trying to keep the outside world from listening in, but he was tapped to help president kennedy listen in on his own conversations. >> it was 22 years before 1984. >> that's right, one microphone was in the knee hole and the other one was in the cabinet room not far from the oval office. there were some drapes, and he put a couple of microphones in the drapes. in his oral history he mentions that he put microphones in the residence. >> the other question that this naturally occurred, is it possible to find any documentary record of a de
. this move to michelle ng obama's father's side of the family, michelle obama's and and this is steve johnson, the first lady's great-grandmother who traveled to four cities, she was a sharecropper's daughter born in 1879 and somewhere along the way she decided she did not want anything to do with the farming life and she was one of the first of michele obama's and sisters to set site on chicago in 1908. this is her husband who was a minister who also lived in chicago. this is the first lady's great great grandmother, and she arrived in illinois some time in the 1860s. the first lady describes herself as a south side girl but the family had no idea their roots in illinois go that far back. if you look at mary, you will understand why the family story says she was part cherokee. she obviously has a mixed lineage but i was never able to establish for sure whether that was true. this is the first lady's grandfather, a mislabeled slide, who left south carolina and arrive in chicago around 1931. this is millvinia, the owner of millvinia's brother. this is a photo, this is an amazing coat, there is
favorite confidence men because teammate steve martin of a villain. i wonder as you look on the scene today how do you assess president obama as a confidence man and a panoply of confidence men, and not to put a fly in the ointment but how do you assess that from me as a confidence man? >> why don't know. we are going to work this side of the street and work - they said my daughter you are soberly and that funny and smart why don't you run for president? i don't have it in me. at the end of the george bush was trying to go and at the end of the day i was free to shoot myself. [laughter] so there are these people in the system that spend that spend their whole life doing press and their politicians and once in a widely public servant has the capacity to be a public servant and there's time left over at the end of the day between lobbying and banking to take care of the country. and as milton friedman said, we just don't have the time to bone up on the people trying to rob us through the x corporation and rob us through the light union and the people getting a subsidy for this and of that. be
in a room with hitler, the two of them would negotiate a deal. he refused steve cutler was a mad and, that hitler didn't care about the german people, that hitler had other fears that drove him. he believed there would be a rational actor. he told the leader of the zionist community in the first president of israel, he said i'm going to go meet with him, work it out. it became so it anti-churchill, anti-british, antiwar effort that the british opened a file on him, which i founded the national national archives in britain called the candidate and a fine. and in the german archives, there are records of his conversation with the german diplomats wanting to get to berlin to negotiate an end to the war and to negotiate a settlement that would prevent war and i would rescue the jewish refugees. again, not for the first time he had gone from being an insider to the outside. he returned to this country in disgrace. he supported roosevelt for reelection in 1940, which is all roosevelt wanted the way roosevelt did not fire as he should have. he retired and got an interview through the battle
-searching. he ran into steve keever, a young man he talked to the day before at the ever loving trading post. it is strong compact body with his long blond hair and beard looks like gore. i just wanted to touch that, not his hair. he had enormous open-heart. he has to sailors he found out whether he was looking for. he said no, so invited mccarthy for christmas dinner as communal house that evening. when he showed up in 1815 oak street, headquarters at the good earth commune instantly felt he was stepping into a stream of what the haight was supposed to be. you're in a three-story victorian is beautifully kept with shiny oiled wooden floors and heavy velvet curtains. a high ceiling dining room is dominated by huge table that looks like it was constructed with ray road ties and bolted together. a table was filled with platters of food, rose to a winter vegetables mashed potatoes and the room is filling up with people, men, women, babies of all races, white, black, brown, yellow, red. or if he stood quietly in the chaos and took it all in. he knew he'd come home. the good earth commune with es
, walter isaacson's steve jobs, number 4 published in 2011, wild, derek larsson in the garden of beasts, another 2011 title, power of habit, edward klein's at the aging, tina fay's bossy pants, and american sniper was published in january and that was on the list for 17 weeks. sarah weinman, what is wild? >> that was an amazing memoir by a woman who had previously written a novel called for ridge . she described as-she decided on a whim that she would walk the pacific coast, well over a thousand miles and did so with minimal preparation and describe the essentially how doing this long distance walk broke her apart and put her back together again. the big reason why this book was on the best-seller list for so long even though there had been a great deal of attempts, i read it a couple months before publication and certainly understood all the advance height, oprah winfrey decided to revive her book club. she may not have a nationally syndicated show anymore but she does have the oprah winfrey network and her magazine, the 0 prime magazine and many conduits so when she shows wild for the
our facebook page and send it on to all of your friends. one more question. >> i am steve smith, navy 79. we just graduated as a last the last class of the new academy. i am proud of not only my daughter but all the people who followed and her footsteps of the naval academy. [applause] where did the matt freeman foundation go when we got out of -- [inaudible] >> we have an educational theme and at this point it's in any war-torn country. we have people that have started in djibouti and some of the areas over there and we hope to be able to get into other countries as we expand. we really just started a few years ago and the requests are starting to come in more from individuals. we also have large shipments at go to our humanitarian warehouses over there. each one of them is packed with information about matthew and the project and where it came from. i have wonderful pictures of principals in the schools over there holding mattheus pictures saying, someday we would like to meet this woman because we would like to thank her for the tools for our children. so most of it has been local.
, in the memoirs, he was only able to use a signal fraction of the tapes, and i asked steve, head of the library, and it may have been jim at the time, is this public domain? yes. can i use it? yes. as a result, bud was speaking to me every day literally. it was a lucky find. now future generations can use it and some of the personality sketches, made great use of it, intelligence service, all of that is in there, and, particularly, some of the notes on who used the sources and how he infiltrated in, that's all from the tapes. that was the main source of data, the personal papers were a main source of data. the family papers a source of data, and i used the declassified and unclassified documents that are in the history center. getting access i need, i leave that to the next generation. any other questions? i think there was one more. okay. that's a good sign. maybe i answered them all or maybe you want to go back to the bar. on that, thank you, all, it's been a real honor to be here, enjoy the book. every author -- i were the day six years ago when i started this project. every author dreams of
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11